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The Arts and Culture Building Boom

Published May 15, 2018
Urban Milwaukee

The greater downtown building boom extends to more than new apartment complexes. Four of the city’s largest arts and culture organizations are in the process of constructing new buildings or additions. A number of other major projects are waiting in the wings.

The most notable project is without a doubt the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra‘s $80 million plan to transform the empty Warner Grand Theatre into a music hall. But that’s far from the only thing going on.

The Milwaukee Ballet is planning a move to the Historic Third WardDiscovery World is building an addition. And last, not but least, the Milwaukee Art Museum recently completed an addition and is planning to improve O’Donnell Park.

Two other projects are in their early stages. VISIT Milwaukee and the Wisconsin Center District are planning a $200 million expansion of the convention center and the Milwaukee Public Museum is in the early stages of planning an entirely new building.

Representatives of the groups presented updates on their projects to members of the Greater Milwaukee Committee, many of whom are donors to the various efforts, Monday afternoon at the University Club.

Read the full article here.

Beerline Trail receives $50,000 grant

Published May 10, 2018
WTMJ-TV Milwaukee

MILWAUKEE–The Riverwest Beerline Trail area has been awarded $50,000 from the National Endowment of the Arts in order to support development, according to a news release from Mayor Tom Barrett’s office.

The City of Milwaukee’s Department of Public Works is leading the development with a local team of art, design and neighborhood engagement leaders, the Greater Milwaukee Committee, and neighborhood association.

“In Milwaukee we recognize the power of the arts to help move critical city initiatives forward,” said Barrett in a statement. “From neighborhood economic development, to activating formerly abandoned spaces or bringing residents together to reclaim neighborhood parks, artists bring innovative thinking and fresh perspectives.”

This money adds to the initial funding that was made available through the Kresge Foundation.

“We’re very grateful that the NEA, with this Our Town grant, has chosen to recognize our innovative redevelopment and activation efforts along the Beerline Trail,” said Julia Taylor, president of the GMC. “It will further our efforts toward making the Beerline Trail Neighborhood a more inviting and stimulating place for local residents and visitors.”

Read the full article here.

$50K grant awarded to Beerline Trail Neighborhood Development Project in Milwaukee

Published May 10, 2018
Fox 6 News, Milwaukee

MILWAUKEE — The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) awarded a $50,000 Our Town grant on Thursday, May 10 to the Beerline Trail Neighborhood Development Project in the city’s Riverwest Area.

A news release says the grant will be used to support ongoing development along the Beerline Trail, a former railway, running diagonally from the intersection of Burleigh and Bremen Streets to the northwest past Capitol Drive. Project activities along the trail will include temporary and seasonal activation of public space.

Development of the park is being lead by the City of Milwaukee’s Department of Public Works in collaboration with a local team of art, design and neighbor engagement leaders, the Greater Milwaukee Committee and neighborhood associations.

Read the full article here.

NEA Awards $50,000 Grant to Support Development of Beerline Trail

Published May 10, 2018
Press Release by Mayor Tom Barrett, as published in Urban Milwaukee

 

MILWAUKEE – The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has awarded a $50,000 Our Town grant to the Beerline Trail Neighborhood Development Project in the city’s Riverwest Area.

The grant will be used to support ongoing development along the Beerline Trail, a former railway, running diagonally from the intersection of Burleigh and Bremen Streets to the northwest past Capitol Drive. Project activities along the trail will include temporary and seasonal activation of public space.

Development of the park is being lead by the City of Milwaukee’s Department of Public Works in collaboration with a local team of art, design and neighbor engagement leaders, the Greater Milwaukee Committee and neighborhood associations.

“In Milwaukee we recognize the power of the arts to help move critical city initiatives forward,” said Mayor Tom Barrett.  “From neighborhood economic development, to activating formerly abandoned spaces or bringing residents together to reclaim neighborhood parks, artists bring innovative thinking and fresh perspectives.”

“We’re very grateful that the NEA, with this Our Town grant, has chosen to recognize our innovative redevelopment and activation efforts along the Beerline Trail,” said Julia Taylor, president of the GMC. “It will further our efforts toward making the Beerline Trail Neighborhood a more inviting and stimulating place for local residents and visitors.”

 

Read the full press release here.

Medical College educates many physicians, but not enough reach central city

Published April 9, 2018
Milwaukee Business Journal

With a major boost from the Medical College of Wisconsin, the number of physicians in southeast Wisconsin has increased by more than 400 percent the past 50 years, but some communities — particularly Milwaukee’s central city — remain underserved, according to a new report.

The physician-to-patient ratio in southeastern Wisconsin exceeds the national average, according to the report released Monday by the Wisconsin Policy Forum, formerly known as the Public Policy Forum. The ratio today is 521 physicians per 100,000 population compared with 119 physicians per 100,000 in 1967, the report found.

Of course, the number of people living in Wisconsin has greatly increased since 1967, so the increase in the number of physicians practicing actually exceeds the 400 percent increase in the per-100,000 patients ratio.

The Medical College of Wisconsin was created in 1967 after the closing of Marquette University School of Medicine. In 1978 it relocated to the Milwaukee Regional Medical Center campus in Wauwatosa. The Wisconsin Policy Forum reviewed how well the private medical school has performed in achieving goals set in 1967 by the Heil Commission, which called for public and private financing to create the regional medical center including the Medical College.

The Medical College has “largely fulfilled” the goals established 50 years ago by a commission that included civic leaders from the Greater Milwaukee Committee (GMC), said Rob Henken, president of the Wisconsin Policy Forum.

Read the full article here.